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Episode  Summary:

Travis welcomes to his podcast Saket Saurabh, who provides a window into the world of data management and the self-service options that are democratizing it. Co-founder and CEO of Nexla, Saket has a passion for data and infrastructure and how to improve its flow among partners, customers and vendors. Nexla automates various data engineering tasks, intelligently creates an abstraction of data and enables collaboration among people at different skill levels. Named a 2021 Cool Vendor by Gartner, Nexla is a leader in data preparation, integration and tracking.

Nexla: 

It’s a platform that brings all the pieces together where otherwise only fragmented tools exist. Nexla’s core capability bridges together the integration, preparation and monitoring of data. It’s a user-friendly platform that can be scaled for use across the enterprise. Typically serving mid- to large-size organizations, Nesla offers an easy-to-use no code system able to take on complex use cases. It supports ETL, ELT, Reverse ETL, streaming integration and API integration.

Metadata is Difficult to Capture:

The first stumbling block for most organizations is not knowing where to locate their data. Many commercial data cataloguing companies have limited connector capabilities. Most can catalog databases and tables because those systems are rich in metadata. But CSVs and Excel files, APIs or Kafka streams can pose a challenge. Integration teams have built a lot of connectors while cataloging teams have not necessarily been solving for this problem.

Looking Towards the Future:

The ELT model has become central while streaming and real-time use cases are becoming prevalent. Architecture in general is moving towards a more multi-modal approach.
Saket believes that architecture overall needs a more abstract element that isn’t evident to users who are benefiting from it. Another architectural pattern Saket observes is revisiting how connectors are designed. Data tools need to seamlessly connect with data systems. He believes innovation is (or should be) on the horizon to crack the connector challenge.

Top 3 Value Bombs:

  1. Data architectures overall need to be more abstract to enable future flexibility
  2. The first stumbling block for most organizations is not knowing where to locate their data.
  3. ETL is dead. The ELT model has become central while streaming and real-time use cases are becoming prevalent.

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